The Fairy Diary Day 642 #TFDbyRWOz2

Meribabell writes:

We sailed our way out of the narrow straits and into the open sea.  No one minded at all leaving that string of islands behind. 

Rumble and I kept up our duties about the ship. Merlin joined one or the other of us as the need arose, and even took a watch himself. But he never climbed the rigging. He had his own way of making the sails bend to his will. 

Our dragon riders continued to take turns dropping in. When it came Gibley’s turn he asked us if we could do without his presence. He thought that he and Conjil would forgo accompanying us all the way to Corbelin since it seemed their being here was rather superfluous. As for Clemjil, the goblin decided not to take the young dragon with him. After all he had been released by his uncle to be a protector of the bell in the repository. Merlin concurred and we assembled to bid our friend a fond farewell. 

Gibley flew by Dunfallon and Noralei to say goodbye before he and Conjil left for the east and the canyonlands. 

The sun was just going down as I came up for my watch when Nora hailed me from over the ship’s side. He barely could get the words out as he excitedly reported that one of the prisoners was trying to escape. 

I leaned over the rail and saw that the Caretaker has hanging halfway out – caught in the porthole three sizes too small for him. For five wingbeats I considered leaving him there, but when Merlin checked on him, he yanked him back inside the cabin and sealed the porthole. 

I made sure the renegade queen was still under lock and spell before returning to my watch. 

The Fairy Diary Day 251 #TFDbyRWOz2

Meribabell writes:

It all came to pass as experienced in my vision. For one exact moment at least. Our ship was clipping along, the bow wave curling just below the painted eyes. 

Rumble and I passed by Noralei and Dunfallon as they ended their shift. They were smiling and laughing and had found their first watch exhilarating. 

The captain was very satisfied with our progress. 

But then at midday the wind that had been steadfastly favorable dropped off entirely. And the images from my vision evaporated. 

There was not a breath of air from any quarter that would fill our sails. 

So, between us, Rumble and I convinced the captain to try a different method. At our instruction he wet the sails down and with me behind the first and Rumble the second, we beat our wings and created our own breeze. Though far from as fast as before we at least maintained some forward momentum. 

Even with frequent rests, we were quite tired by the end of our watch. And left the chore to Noralei with the caution to rest often.