Day Five Hundred Fifteen #DiaryoftheEndoftheWorld

This city is a jumble. The people are milling about everywhere. Many have taken up residence in the streets, and thereby impede all movement.

We have spent a good part of the morning trying to find a way through to the harbor area. No street runs straight. We would choose a likely prospect only to be disappointed when it lead to a dead end or took a turn to the opposite direction.

Everyone we ask either doesn’t know where the harbor is located  or didn’t even know there was one. Seems we are all new to the city. And all strangers.

Then turning one corner, first Elijah then I heard the melody I had awakened to just two days ago.

Day Four Hundred Sixty #DiaryoftheEndoftheWorld

Elijah took me on a tour of the city underground. The hum of electricity and the knock of water in pipes dogged our every step. Residence after residence proved empty. So Elijah changed direction and lead us to their subterranean meeting place.

Silence greeted us there. I found the light switch and turned it on. It broke the quiet only to reveal no one was there either. Elijah discovered a tally sheet. A vote had been taken – an unanimous decision to abandon the city for the island interior.

Explanations were made to the Captain in the morning from what little we knew. We asked leave to open the three cargo containers.

Inside was equipment to brand people with the mark.

Day Two Hundred Eighty #DiaryoftheEndoftheWorld

Elam, the name of the former madman, goes where we go and lives where we live. He hangs on every word that Elijah passes on to him.

Sy’s parents invited us (Elam included) around to the back of their residence where they supplied us with food. Elijah again tried to persuade them to go to their son, adding that the city’s days are numbered. They declined again, but this time I sense some hesitation.

We turned our faces to the city center. Along the way Elam stopped at each cross street and called out the dire warning. “Twenty nine days!”

Elijah spoke on the administration building’s steps. They still deny us access.

The crowds are getting bigger and linger longer.