Day Seven Hundred Forty Nine #DiaryoftheEndoftheWorld

We are descending. Not from the mountains, that is certain. Just into a space at a lower elevation than the peaks around. And signs of habitation therein raises our curiosity.

Even now Tomas has left us to see what he can see. The Captain advises again to go around rather than through.

I walked and talked with Mei all day. She laid bare her heart and even now holds out hope. This despite word from all quarters, save Tomas himself for he has been avoiding her.

I intend to speak to Elijah about this, but I am sure he will tell me that it is up to Tomas to make his intentions clear.

Thus the torture continues for poor Mei.

Advertisements

Day Seven Hundred Forty Eight #DiaryoftheEndoftheWorld

Our attention was driven to another topic today – the cold. We are so thankful for the extra clothing that the Supreme Commander had ordered for us. We kept moving as the best means to combat it, lingering long in those areas we could stay out of the wind.

From each respite we pushed on in silence. Something easy to do, for we wrapped our heads, covering our mouths.

I had a lot of time to think as we went along. I have a growing burden – to talk with Mei, and relay to her some small insights that should help her through the days ahead.

I am thankful for this time to formulate my ideas into a cohesive and comprehensive expression.

Day Seven Hundred Forty Seven #DiaryoftheEndoftheWorld

Tomas went about his normal duties today. His self imposed ones as I think about it. Withal not unappreciated.

Our talk yesterday was mutually beneficial. We were both relieved that we were thinking along the same lines. If anything he was more aware of his calling than any of us gave him credit for. He was grateful for my understanding and support.

He was very concerned that Mei not feel rejected. I was able to assure him that Elijah has been hard at work helping her to see and experience that she is welcome, and the Captain has informed me that her eyes are opening to the reality of Hamashiach.

And I wonder what the Spirit’s plan is for Mei.

Day Seven Hundred Forty Six #DiaryoftheEndoftheWorld

Lung parted from our little band this morning. He made one last attempt to persuade Mei to return with him. But she was adamant about remaining with us.

Lung accepted her decision at the last, and even offered to report that she had perished back at the glacier.

I, however, suggested he merely report that they had been separated and that he had no knowledge where she was.

I believe he understood the gist of my comment, and hope to trust in his discretion. Though I have a nagging doubt where Lung is concerned.

Mei spent the day with the Captain. He had a lot to share about Tomas.

I went out with our young friend for a long conversation.

Day Seven Hundred Forty Five #DiaryoftheEndoftheWorld

Waited all day for an opportunity to talk to Tomas alone. I would have accompanied him on one of his jaunts, but didn’t want to leave Elijah and the Captain without my support. Lung has been outwardly calm, yet I can tell agitation is festering just below the surface. Every step is taking us further and further away from his unit. If only he would talk to Elijah again. Lung has been avoiding him ever since the glacier.

Thankfully, Tomas brought word of another path branching off this one. He is certain it will take Lung back down. If not to the lake, at least to the desert.

I also decided to put off my talk with Tomas until tomorrow.

Day Seven Hundred Forty Four #DiaryoftheEndoftheWorld

Lung was continually on the lookout for another way down. Elijah assigned the Captain to stay by his side and save him from any rash action.

This has been made easier by the loss of both soldiers’ weapons back on the glacier. I judge we would not have been able to do so otherwise.

Elijah has kept Mei to himself all day. They have remained aloof, keeping their conversation only to themselves. Though I know for sure what they are discussing by her attention to Tomas each time he returns from his scouting.

I believe it will fall to me to talk to Tomas. Certain things he will have to do in the future require that he forgo others now.

Day Seven Hundred Forty Three #DiaryoftheEndoftheWorld

We finally relented, and allowed Lung to go back down the trail, accompanied by Tomas. They reported that the trail was washed out by the force of the water from the glacier.  And that a huge chunk of the glacier had cascaded down to a lower elevation.

Still, Lung desires to get back to his unit with this intelligence. And to see if any of the runoff has made its way down to the lake.

Elijah advised him to continue on with us until another way down can be found.

At the same time, Mei let it be known that she does not want to return.

This caught Lung completely by surprise.

We put further discussion aside and continued on.

Tracking Down a Marine Fifer

Tracking Down a Marine Fifer

I recently had the fun of running down information about a US Marine who had been assigned to the USNA in 1860. Or to be more precise, a marine who had been attached to the USS Plymouth, the naval academy’s school ship for their cruise the summer of that pivotal year. It was a convoluted task, that commenced with only the slimmest of leads.

My jumping off point was the US census for Annapolis for that year. I was scrolling down through the names of the superintendent, the professors and officers, and the midshipmen – and sandwiched between those midshipmen and some US sailors was a short list of seventeen names. All listed as ‘US Marines.’ And all with places of birth listed as ‘Unknown.’ I used their names as the springboard for my online searches.

So, I went through four names –

1- John Rossman age 25

2 – George Rymes age 30

3 – A. E. Clark age 40

4 – R. Hamilton age 37

– before I got a hit with number 5:

5 – L Reinburg age 34

I was using Ancestry.com which has an excellent database of scanned military documents.  My meagre ‘L Reinburg’ search returned a couple pages worth of US Marine muster rolls.

(I like the US Marine muster rolls. With them I have been able to trace the entire service career, month by month, of one of the midshipmen I have been researching – he had switched from the Navy to that branch).

Four of these records outlined Reinburg’s presence on the USS Plymouth, June through September of 1860. And gave me his first name – Louis. I input this new information and the year 1826 (calculated from his age in the census), a mistake as it later turned out.

Two different ‘Louis Reinburgs’ popped up. One born in Saxony, Germany seemed to be the one for whom I was looking. But he was a good deal older, having been born around 1819. The other had been born in Philadelphia, but twenty years younger than he should have been if the 1860 census was correct. It was obvious that they were father and son with the same names. But which was my marine?

I was leaning towards the older Louis until I found naval lists with this native of Saxony listed as a landsman, a naval rank. Since there were marine records for the second Louis in the same years as this navy man, I switched my hunch to the younger Louis.

But how was I to resolve the “age” issue?

A Google search did point to a Louis C. Reinburg who died in 1903, and had a career in the marines. But he had switched to the navy sometime in 1864. This was starting to get more confusing.

The Marine muster rolls proved to hold the key.

I compared all four muster rolls for the USS Plymouth. The names were the same on each one. I then compared them to the names in the census. They were all the same. Or almost all the same. (The census taker as you will see had some issues).

The first five for the USS Plymouth:

John Bauman – Orderly Sergeant, enlisted March 30, 1857 (not Rossman, whoever wrote out the name did not close the bottom of the “B,” wrote an “a” that looked like an “o” and the peaks of his “u’ looked like a double “s.”)

George Byrnes – Corporal, re-enlisted May 20, 1858 (not Rymes, the same issue with the “B”, plus an “r” and an “n” that looked like an “m.”)

Elisha A Clarke – Corporal, re-enlisted June 6, 1858 (not A. E. – perhaps dyslexic?)

Robert Hamilton – Musician, enlisted Feb 23, 1860

Louis Reinburg – Musician, enlisted Aug 29, 1856

The rest of the names on the muster lists are all privates, and match, in order, and almost exactly (save one), the names on the census. Tracing Reinburg back to his enlistment I found him on a muster roll for August 1856 at the Marine Barracks in Washington DC.  But his rank was delineated as “Boy.” (His comrade Robert Hamilton is on the same roll with the same rank).

I had to look up this rank to see what light it might shed on my marine. And I came up with this quote:

“’Boys,’ the lowest rung on the rating and pay scales and one
traditionally reserved for young men under the age of eighteen.”

     This Louis Reinburg was born in 1846, so he was the ripe old age of ten when he enlisted in the marines. Following forward he became a fifer in 1857, and was serving as such on the Plymouth. His fellow marine, Robert Hamilton, was a drummer.

     The two had served together in the same capacities on a cruise in the USS Jamestown between 1858 and 1860, just before their time on the Plymouth. So no doubt they were a team.

     Reinburg took his honorable discharge from the marines in 1864, and then enlisted in the Navy as an Acting Master in the Volunteer Navy. He served the rest of the war and beyond, taking his honorable discharge from that service in 1868 at the age of 22, having given twelve years of his life in service to his country. A service that he continued as a clerk in the Pension Office of the United States.

Day Seven Hundred Forty Two #DiaryoftheEndoftheWorld

When we reached Mei, Lung estimated that she had slipped deeper into the crevasse since his absence.

We could see the problem right off. Her wedged backpack was pulling her down, even as the crack opened more.

Tomas wasted no time and descended to her. An agony of minutes passed before he could free her from the dead weight. But as soon as he did, we pulled them both up.

We had no respite to savor the moment, for Mei urged us to depart immediately. That whole section of the glacier she felt was in danger of collapse.

So we ended up back with Elijah and the Captain today.

We had to restrain Lung from returning back down the mountain.

Day Seven Hundred Forty One #DiaryoftheEndoftheWorld

Tomas had been making as many trips back down the trail as forward. A fact that had not escaped Elijah’s notice.

Tomas just returned from a long absence in the rear and Elijah stopped him before he could set off into the advance again. Instead he dispatched him to trace our path all the way back to wherever Lung and Mei may be.

I accompanied him. And Elijah and the Captain set up camp to wait.

We came to the brook, a torrent of rushing water. And there ran into Lung descending off of the mountain. He begged us to return with him to help rescue Mei. She had slipped into a crevasse they had opened accidentally with the flamethrower.